5 Ways America Can Improve Its Relationship with South Korea

South Korean President Moon Jae-in looks at U.S. President Donald Trump after delivering a joint statement from the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 30, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

And it’s not all about North Korea, either.

South Korea’s contribution to multinational peacekeeping efforts has had its ups and downs. Americans have been waiting for a U.S. administration interested in reform and dealing with appalling abuses in UN peacekeeping operations. There is a space for the two countries to work together on a common agenda—if not making peacekeeping great again, then at least pushing the international community to back operations that are suitable and feasible, as well as efficacious and respectably managed.

Doubtless policymakers and the media of both nations will continue to focus on North Korea. But other officials are responsible for the five opportunities listed above, and they should be able to make progress even as other’s eyes are drawn to Pyongyang.

Now that Moon and Trump have finished their first date, the time has come to think about how to manage what hopefully be a protracted honeymoon. There are more than enough critical common interests to keep the relationship fresh. It is time to pick up the pace in bilateral contacts.

A Heritage Foundation vice president, James Jay Carafano directs the think tank’s research in issues pertaining to national security and foreign relations.

Image: South Korean President Moon Jae-in looks at U.S. President Donald Trump after delivering a joint statement from the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, U.S., June 30, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

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