A Year on, Foreign Policy Restrainers Assess the Trump Administration

Image: U.S. President Donald Trump stands in front of a U.S. flag while listening to U.S. first lady Melania Trump give a speech to U.S. troops at the Naval Air Station Sigonella before returning to Washington D.C. at Sigonella Air Force Base in Sigonella, Sicily, Italy, May 27, 2017REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

The American Conservative’s conference in Washington last week was a more muted affair than the heady gathering after Trump’s shock victory last year.

And in Syria, “Assad, the Syrian army, Iran, the Shia militia, Hezbollah, and the Russians won, notwithstanding Tillerson’s statement that Assad must leave. When you look at what would be required to reverse that new reality in Syria and Iraq, hard to believe that the U.S. will attempt that with a new Desert Storm,” Buchanan added. “We shall see.”

Still, for the president who was feted by many in this crowd as the heir to Buchanan, a collective assessment of where the country is a year after his election offered room for caution. These large gatherings can be instructive: who at the moment is winning the battle for Trump’s favor? So far, the jury is out.

Curt Mills is a foreign-affairs reporter at the National Interest. Follow him on Twitter: @CurtMills.

Image: U.S. President Donald Trump stands in front of a U.S. flag while listening to U.S. first lady Melania Trump give a speech to U.S. troops at the Naval Air Station Sigonella before returning to Washington D.C. at Sigonella Air Force Base in Sigonella, Sicily, Italy, May 27, 2017REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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